Great news for salty licorice fans in Seattle: Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream, Wallingford and a brand-spankin’-new Cap Hill location, have announced their new flavors, and Salty Licorice is one of the lot!

For those unfamiliar with salty licorice (“Salmiakki”), it’s like regular licorice, but also flavored with ammonium chloride, which is almost but not quite entirely unlike table salt. It’s not quite an acquired taste; this is one of those items that you either lovelovelove or ABSOLUTELY despise. If you don’t like regular ol’ licorice, or are one of those crazies who toss the black jellybeans, do yourself a favor and don’t even think about trying the salty stuff.

On our recent trip to Europe, me an’ E had a layover in Copenhagen. Since salty licorice is a Scandinavian delicacy, I ended up bringing a plethora of the delicious stuff back with me in various forms (E thinks it’s nasty).

My favorite so far is “Turkish Pepper”– the hard, licorice shell is filled with about a teaspoon of pure salmiac, and once you’ve cracked in, it explodes in a spicy, savory, sweet sensation that must be experienced rather than described:

In the non-salty category, I procured some Skipper’s Pipes, which I suppose must be the Danish version of candy cigarettes:
skipper's pipe
The strangest non-salty confectionary, however, may be the licorice fudge:
licorice fudge
It’s exactly what it sounds like: black blocks of candy that have the exact consistency of fudge, but are flavored with licorice. It’s actually quite nice; the licorice flavoring is rather mild, and those with whom I’ve shared it have pretty unanimously enjoyed it.

If you live in Seattle and enjoy licorice, and would like to give the salty kind a try, you can find a fairly small variety at Olsen’s Scandinavian Foods in Ballard. Or, you could wait until this weekend, and look for me at the closest Molly Moon’s!

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